Setting Sail From a Safe Harbor

**日本語訳は下にあります**
“This is where my story starts. It’s Saigon 1975 and there were huge events happening. In America, there were many people protesting the war in Vietnam. For the Vietnamese like my mother and father, they were trying to find any way to find a better life. So my dad decided the only way to do that was to leave Vietnam because it was so war torn. One night, my dad without any kind of warning, got my mom and eldest brother on a boat with one hundreds of other refugees and they set sail out to the Pacific ocean. They were out on the ocean for three days, hoping to find land somewhere else. Eventually there was a helicopter flying over, and my mom being the genius that she is (I love you mom), saw the helicopter and lit a bunch of clothes on fire. The helicopter saw the smoke and called a container ship which picked up all the refugees and took them to the Philippines. From the Philippines, my dad reached out to his friends in the American army, and they were able to sponsor my family through a Christian church in Seattle. My mom and dad would go on to have five more kids, of which I am the youngest son.

“When I was growing up I tried really hard to figure out what it meant to be Vietnamese, and also what it meant to be American. I spoke Vietnamese at home, but in public I only spoke English, I was trying to balance this dual lifestyle. It wasn’t until I arrived at university where I was given the opportunity to go to Vietnam on study abroad, and leave the US for the first time. It was there that I developed a better understanding and appreciation for my heritage and culture. Initially I was nervous, my mother and father had never been back since immigrating. It had been so traumatizing to leave they feared going back. I was one of the first members of my family to go back and to bridge this forty year gap between the day my family left Vietnam as refugees to the day I arrived in Vietnam as the son of Vietnamese immigrants. With the help of my family I was able to reconnect with my relatives in Vietnam. I showed them pictures of my dad as proof we were family since they initially didn’t recognize me at first. I will never forget the look on their faces when we reconnected after all these years.

How does Japan fit into my story? I fell in love with exploring the world after my Vietnam journey.

“I realized there was more to the world than just my hometown, Seattle. I knew I wanted to continually explore the world but didn’t know how to turn my dream into a reality. After graduation I took the safe route and started working in Seattle, and to be honest I didn’t feel fulfilled. The work was great and people were nice but there was something that didn’t make me feel whole. It was like I had achieved the “American Dream” ーI was a first generation kid from immigrant parents with a college education, a nice job, a car, and an apartment. But it turned out that this wasn’t my dream. I wasn’t happy and I kept thinking, ‘there has to be more to life’. I wasn’t following my real passion, so I quit my job, sold my things and I set sail from the safe harbor.

“First I bought a one way ticket back to Vietnam and I continued on my journey to Cambodia, Thailand, Malaysia, India, Sri Lanka, and Nepal. During these travels, I was accepted to the JET Programme and I was placed in Tokyo.

“When I got to my school in Tokyo, the student’s brains were scattered. I was an American of Vietnamese descent, who could of course speak fluent English. I didn’t fit into their perceived notion of an American. I have been teaching in Tokyo for 3 years now and I believe I have broken those stereotypes amongst the people I have come across in Japan. I have found teaching to be rewarding and fulfilling work, and all this would not have been possible if I didn’t take the risk of following my passion. I am reminded of my parent’s decision to leave their homeland, standing on the shores of Vietnam, staring into the vastness of the Pacific Ocean, into the unknown, and finding the courage to follow their passion and set sail from the safe harbor.”

私のストーリーは1975年のサイゴンから始まります。当時のサイゴンでは事件が次々に起きていて、アメリカでは、多くの人がベトナム戦争の抗議活動をしていました。僕の母や父のようなベトナム人は、なんとか今より良い生活をつかもうと必死で、ベトナムはとっくに荒廃していたので、父はついに去る決断をしました。アメリカ軍がほとんど自分の家の裏庭のような近さにいたのもあり、当時の多くの南ベトナム人はアメリカ軍の味方をしていました。ある夜、父は何の前触れもなく、兄と母を連れて、太平洋に向けて出港する100名の難民が乗るボートに乗ります。100名の難民は、陸地がどこかにみつからないか願いながら、海の上を三日間漂っていました。やがて、一機のヘリコプターが飛んできて、いまも当時も天才である私の母は(アイラブユーマム!)、ヘリコプターを発見してすぐに服の山に火をつけたんです。ヘリは煙を見て事態を把握し、コンテナ船を呼んで難民全員を救助、フィリピンへと送ってくれました。フィリピンに着いてから、父はフィリピンのアメリカ軍にいた友人にたどり着くことができ、彼らがスポンサーとなって父と母と兄をシアトルの教会へと送ってくれました。その後、母と父は子供を次々にもうけたので、僕は五人兄弟の末っ子となります。

思春期のころ、ベトナム人であること、そしてアメリカ人であることが何を意味するのかを、本当に深く考えていました。家ではベトナム語を話すけれど、外では英語で会話をする。この二重生活のバランスを取ろうと必死だったんです。大学に入学して、人生で初めてアメリカを発ちベトナムへ行く機会を与えられるまで、その悩みは続いていました。ベトナムへ行く前、私は精神的にはりつめてもいました。母と父がトラウマによって二度と戻ることのできない場所へ帰るということ。そして、自分の家族の中で初めてベトナムに戻り、過去40年間の空白の橋渡しをするということ。ベトナムに行き、なんとか親戚を見つけることができ、自分たちが家族だったことの証明として、僕の父の写真を彼らに見せました。親戚達はみんな「ありえない」と、驚愕していました。

日本が私のストーリーのどこに絡むかというと、ベトナム旅行を終えてから、私は旅行に恋に落ちてしまいました。シアトル以外に世界にはこんなにも多くのものがある、と。なので、自分は20代は頻繁に世界を探索したいと思っていた、のは分かっているけれど、でも結局、大学を卒業してシアトルにあるIT企業で働き始めることにしました。それで、結局、正直に言えば超残念だったした。仕事は素晴らしかったし同僚もいい人たちだったけれど、でも何かが欠けていて、”完全”だと感じることができなかったんです。良い仕事、車、マンション、犬を持っている移民二世、自分はまさにアメリカンドリームのようなものだったのにも関わらず、幸せだと感じることができなくて、ずっと「これは自分の人生じゃない」と考えていました。自分の本当の夢を追っていなかったんです。だから辞めました。ルールがあって均整のとれた安全な港から、帆を出すことにしたんです。

まず最初に、ベトナム行きの片道航空券を手に入れて、その後、カンボジア、タイ、マレーシア、インド、スリランカ、ネパールと旅を続けました。その旅をしている間に、JETプログラムにアプライしてパスすることができたので、いま東京で働いているわけです。

東京の学校で働き始めた時、子どもたちの頭は混乱していました。ベトナム人の祖先をもつアメリカ人、もちろん英語をぺらぺらに話すことができる。子どもたちの「アメリカ人」という既成概念にフィットしなかった。だから日本で会う人々の、こういうステレオタイプを壊すことができたらいいなと思ってます。_D3S4971.jpg

Published by

tokyointerlopers

Finding diversity and inclusion. Breaking down barriers one post at a time. Stories and snapshots of foreigners making their way in Japan.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s