Lovesick

**日本語訳は下をご覧ください**
“My grandparents were taken
from California and put in various internment camps, then they moved to Chicago. My Great Granddad actually came to the United States from Japan, my family stayed there and everyone married into the Japanese community that was already there. There was a lot of difficult history in that period with the internment camps. After moving to Chicago, they really tried to distance themselves from their heritage. They didn’t speak Japanese and they didn’t want my Mom to speak Japanese, all in an effort to appear more American. Even so, my Mom was bullied quite a bit in school for being Japanese to which my grandparents just said `try and be as American as possible’. As a Japanese American who loves Japan, It’s been interesting because I think, I’m the first person in my family to turn back towards Japan. My Mom had never been to Japan until I invited her here.

I had a conversation with her recently asking her `how does she feel being a Japanese American?’ because as soon as she married she got rid of her Japanese middle name, because she hated it. It was ‘Masako’ which I think is really pretty, but people used to call her ‘Sak’ or ‘Sako’ and made fun of her for it.

“She didn’t feel a lot of Japanese pride. She doesn’t make Japanese food and we don’t have any Japanese things in our house, but I think that the fact that I’ve come here and had experiences here, and shown her what I love about this country, I think, in her own way, she’s reclaiming that part of herself that she didn’t really know about before and that makes me really happy.

“The thing that caught my imagination the most is Japan itself. If you look at what I’ve done in my life, in some ways it’s all connected to this country. I still remember my first trip here, it was transformative. For example, I learnt the value of trying new things and I’m more willing to open myself up to new experiences. I’m kind of lovesick for it. It’s the thread that ties my life together. There’s something about this place and the people I meet here.

“I feel like I pine for it the way that I pine for people. When I’m away from Japan for a long time, I watch videos and look at pictures of it, and cook Japanese food. Just being close to it makes me excited in the same way as being close to someone who strikes a chord with me makes me excited. I get goosebumps when I come back here. I was so afraid that the feeling was going to go away. I thought `This can’t last, right?’ or `I’m going to get jaded at some point, right?’ That fear also makes me want to enjoy it now while I still feel that way.”

Interview & photograph by: Mark Horbury
DSC_2624-2

私の祖父母は第二次世界大戦中カリフォニア州に住んでいた時に強制収容所に入りましたが、戦後シカゴへ引っ越しました。実は、曾祖父が日本からアメリカに移住し、カリフォニア州に在住していた日本人コミュニティーで家庭を持ちました。収容所にいた時には本当に苦労したそうです。シカゴに引っ越した後、日本人であることを断ち切る覚悟をしたそうです。より自身をアメリカ人らしく見せるために、日本語を話すのをやめ、母にも日本語を教えませんでした。アメリカ人らしく振る舞っていた母ですが、それでも幼い頃、とてもいじめられたそうです。そんな時祖母は「もっとアメリカ人らしく振る舞いなさい」と母にアドバイスしていたそう。日本が大好きな日系アメリカ人として、日本に興味を持って来日したのは私だけだという事は面白いと思います。母が初めて日本を訪れたきっかけは、私です。

母が結婚したときに嫌いだった日本名(ミドルネーム)をすぐに捨てたことを思い出し、「日系人でいることをどう思うか」ということを最近話し合いました。母のミドルネームは「マサコ」。とてもきれいな名前だと私は思いましたが、母は子供の頃に周りから「サック」か「サコ」と呼ばれていじめられていましたから。日本人としての誇りは全くなかったそうです。日本食も作らないし、家に日本のものは一つもない。しかし、私の来日をきっかけに好きな日本の文化などを紹介してから、母も母なりに日本人でいることについて考えが変わりかけていると思います。それはとても嬉しいこと。

私はずっと日本に興味を持っていました。今までの人生を振り替えると、私がしてきた事は全部日本になんとなく繋がっていた気がします。初めて来日した時のことがとても印象的で今でもよく覚えています。例えば、新しいことに挑戦することの価値観を学び、今は前よりも新しい経験をしたいと思うようになりました。「大好き」という感覚よりも、もっと大きいかもしれません。この感覚が私を日本と繋ぎ止めてくれています。この国やこの国の人に、なにか特別な繋がりを感じています。

日本にいないと日本が恋しくなります。しばらく日本を離れていると、日本のビデオや写真を見たり、日本食を作ったりします。好きな人と一緒にいる時と同じような感覚で、日本にいるときはドキドキします。日本に帰ってくるたびドキドキして鳥肌が立ってしまいます。いつか、そんな愛情のような感覚がなくなるかもしれない事が怖いです。「こんな気持ち、永遠に続くわけがないでしょう」とか「いつか嫌になるのでは」と思ったことがあるからこそ、今、日本を精一杯楽しみたいと思います。

【記事/写真:Mark Stephen Horbury
【翻訳:Kaci Lewis】

Published by

tokyointerlopers

Finding diversity and inclusion. Breaking down barriers one post at a time. Stories and snapshots of foreigners making their way in Japan.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s