Making an Impact

**日本語訳は下をご覧ください**
“I came to Japan to get a chance to be together with my dad. He was always away since I was two years old. He would only come home to Romania for a maximum of six months a year, then he’d be off again to play jazz and classical music in Japan. He’s a violinist. According to him, there’s a market for his kind of music here and there are people who really like listening to him perform as an artist, but that’s why I hated this country when I was little, even though I hardly knew anything about it. Because of Japan, I didn’t really get to spend much time with him while growing up. In my mind, this was a faraway place where my dad would go and leave us. Good thing he always came back home with omiyage (souvenir) and interesting stories about the food, the customs, how people removed their shoes before entering a house, and stuff like that.

“Now I’m attending university in Tokyo. I originally wanted to go to the U.K. but my dad convinced me to come here, instead. It was a big change for me and my mom, especially for her, since she doesn’t really speak that much English. Thankfully, I do, although I had no knowledge of Japanese before.

Plus I felt some pressure to behave more like people here in the beginning because I really wanted to integrate. Then I realized I’ll never be Japanese anyway, so now I just channel all my energy into more productive activities, such as volunteering and political conferences.

“I used to volunteer at NPOs when I was in high school, but the language barrier here had kept me from joining. Thankfully, I found ways to contribute while being an active student. After all, a language barrier is just an excuse. Also, I think young people’s voices can really make an impact, no matter how small the scale is. For example, we talk about global issues, such as human rights violation, climate change, religious violence, etc. Then we send a formal proposal to the Japanese government to raise awareness on young people’s opinions. Hopefully, we can make a dent.”

_DSC4539
Futako Tamagawa

「日本に来たのは、父と一緒に過ごす機会を持ちたかったから。わたしは、2歳のころから父とずっと離れて暮らしていたの。当時の父は、長くとも年に6ヶ月しかルーマニアには帰ってこなかった。そして、ジャズやクラシックを演奏するためにまた日本へ戻ってしまう。父はバイオリニストよ。父によると、日本には彼の音楽への需要があって、父の演奏を本当に楽しみにしてる人たちがいるって。日本のことなんてちっとも知らなかったのに、そのせいで日本のことが嫌いだったわ。日本のせいで父と過ごす時間がなかったんだもの。わたしの頭の中の日本は、父がわたしたちを置き去りにして行ってしまう、遠い場所だった。良かったことといえば、父はいつも『オミヤゲ』を持って帰ってきて、日本の食べ物や慣習についてのおもしろい話を聞かせてくれたこと。家に上がるとき、人々はどういう風に靴を脱ぐか、とかね。

今、わたしは東京の大学に通っている。もともとはイギリスの大学に行きたいと思っていたけれど、日本に来るよう父に説得されたの。わたしと母にとってはこれが大きな変化だった。特に、英語もそれほど話せない母にとってはね。幸いわたしは英語が話せたけれど、当時は日本語の知識なんて無かった。そのうえ日本に来てすぐのころは、日本人のようにふるまわなければいけないというプレッシャーも感じていた。本当にこの国に溶けこみたいと思っていたのね。そうしてわたしは、いずれにしても自分が日本人になれるわけじゃないって気づいた。それからは、ボランティア活動や政治的会議のような、より生産的な活動に自分の全エネルギーを向けることにしたの。

わたしは高校生のころ、NPOでボランティアをしていたの。日本に来てからは、言葉の壁のせいでそういった活動に参加できなかった。でもありがたいことに、大学へ通いながらでもできることを見つけられた。結局のところ言葉の問題はただの言い訳にすぎなかったのよ。それにわたしは、規模の大小はあれど、若者たちの声には本当に影響力があると思っているの。例えばわたしたちは、人権侵害や気候の変動、宗教的暴力といったグローバルな問題について話し合う。そして、若者たちの意見にもっと目を向けてもらえるよう、正式なプロポーザルを日本政府に提出するの。たとえ少しずつでも、前進していると信じているわ。」

【翻訳:Junko Kato Asaumi】

Published by

tokyointerlopers

Finding diversity and inclusion. Breaking down barriers one post at a time. Stories and snapshots of foreigners making their way in Japan.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s