Great Expectations

**日本語訳は下をご覧ください**
Being pregnant three times in Japan
, I felt a lot of societal pressure. It’s not unusual to have to quit your job and take time to prepare to become a mother, so that your central focus can be your child. In New Zealand, where I’m from, you can be pregnant, give birth, have your work, your life, and also become a mother. If you want to return to work after birth people won’t say, ‘poor kid’ about putting your child into childcare. Over here it’s a little harder emotionally too, during pregnancy. Fellow women gave me advice, such as,

You should be wearing flat shoes, or baggier clothes, or working less, or exercising less.” I felt a bit restricted at times during pregnancy. When I choose not to follow the advice I get, “Oh well, she’s a foreigner, she’s got her own way of doing things.”

I have experienced pregnancy and childbirth 3 times in Japan. With the first child, I tried to do everything the doctors and my extended family suggested and it ended up being really stressful. So for the second and third children, I did what I thought would be good for me and the baby. I ate what I wanted to (within reason) because I pregnancy should be enjoyed and celebrated, not treated as some kind of illness or that women need to be restricted. Here, you are told to wear a belly band (haramaki) to keep your baby warm (even in the middle of summer), flat shoes only, you shouldn’t dye your hair, you shouldn’t get gel nails. There are so many personal restrictions, I felt like I was wrapped in cotton wool.

Pregnant PM

When New Zealand’s Prime Minister, Jacinda Ardern started her term, then announced her pregnancy, I thought it was amazing. To be working or even leading the country while you’re pregnant I think is just great. The message I took from her was that women can do anything. Her actions showed the world that New Zealand as a people will support you to the point where you’ll still be able to be pregnant and lead the country. I really felt like she must have good emotional, physical, medical, and business related support from her partner, the members of her party, and New Zealand Parliament. Perhaps PM Ardern has babysitters, a nanny, au pair, helpers? I’m not sure but I know that that sort of help is available in New Zealand for mothers with children. In my case babysitters are very expensive and nannies or au pairs are really only limited to those who can afford them or have the power to sponsor visas.

Twitter comments

After Prime Minister Ardern announced she was giving birth, I saw Japanese comments on Twitter, saying she was musekinin 無責任 (irresponsible) for getting pregnant in office. Other people said you can’t compare Japan and New Zealand because the population and economy are different. Others discussed differences in Japanese and New Zealand culture. This idea of having a woman leading the country for a start, and then who was pregnant in office, then giving birth and having 6 weeks of leave, is something to give them a little bit of pause for thought. It’s just nice to give people something to think about. The fact that they’re writing on twitter, and talking about it on TV, is good. Even negative discussion is better than nothing, because it’s bringing their thoughts and opinions out, which is good. It gives Japan and its people another way of looking at pregnancy and childbirth.

201807223205184373085545984.jpg
Jessica is a New Zealander, a TV personality and mom to three kids. Follow her on Instagram: @jessintokyo Twitter: @jessintokyo

Motherhood

In my experience, there are a lot of expectations placed on mothers in Japan. Before my children started school I really got a strong feeling from those around me that I ‘should’ be at home, as a stay at home mother, like that was they way they do it and I should do that too. For people that are stay at home mothers now, I think if you like it and it works for you then that is great. I just didn’t appreciate the pressure to become or do something that I realised later was not really suited to me.

The first year after my daughter was born. I stayed at home on childcare leave and became a stay at home mum after working full-time. But for me it felt stressful and like my world had closed in a bit. Other mums would go out for lunch together and bring their babies, have hobbies, go shopping at the mall. It seemed from where I stood that child raising became central focus of their life. I tried my best to be a stay at home mum, but it didn’t really work for me. I realised I needed my own time and space to have my own world however small. My Kiwi mother has been a kindergarten teacher as far back as I can remember, so this idea of raising a child whilst working is something I’ve always thought was just normal. When I announced to my group of Japanese mother friends that I was trying to return to work and was looking for a space in the local childcare for my daughter, the other mums were sort of taken aback. They said “oh you’re going back to work? Why, you don’t like this life?”

During the time when I was a stay at home mum, personally I found that my world started to get really closed in. I felt like there was a lot of competition between mums with kids of the same age. Sometime quite small things like ‘your baby can do this and my baby can do that.’ I think unless you have outside hobbies or something happening outside of the home, people tend to focus on what’s inside the home and what’s closest to them, and comparisons are made. Even things such as where you live, which area of Tokyo, how far away from the station you live, if your house is rented or owned, what car you drive, what your husband does, what clothes you wear. It was a lot of comparing that I just wasn’t used to.

When my daughter turned one, and my childcare leave finished, I decided I would try to return to work. I applied but the childcare – hoikuen, but it was full. This was 9 years ago but in 2018 even with the birthrate being lower we hear of this issue daily.
Over the last year on twitter one particularly angered mother tweeted that she couldn’t return to work as her child hadn’t been given a place at childcare. She tweeted “保育園落ちた。死ね!”, which roughly translates to, “got rejected on childcare applications, go to hell!”

It became a social movement and gained enough momentum that hundreds of people protested outside the government buildings with plackarts baring the tweet that she wrote. After the government pledge to help more women re-enter the workforce and contribute to the economy and aging population, these mothers were very angry at the reality of the situation. I think there is still a bit lack of social infrastructure and actual infrastructure – i.e. child care centres and it will take years to catch up to the pledges that the government makes.

Even though childcare centres are being built, depending on the city and region, there are still children on waiting lists to enter. I’ve had friends who have moved to a different part of Tokyo or out of Tokyo in order to secure a play at childcare.

大きな期待

日本で3度の妊娠、そして出産をされ、結構社会からのプレッシャーを感じました。子供中心での生活や母親になるための準備できるために、会社を辞めるっという話もおかしくない。母国、ニュージーランドでは妊娠してても、出産してても、母親になっても、自分のお仕事、自分の趣味、自分の世界を持つ事が当たり前。出産後復帰はしたい人いたら、復帰するっというまわりから”子供預けて可哀想ね”はあんまりないです。

日本では妊娠中も少し心が疲れます。まわりからアドバイスどんどん言われます(笑)。ぺちゃんこの靴はくべき、妊婦用のふくらしたお洋服着るべき、とか、仕事は減らすべき、運動は減らすべき。ときに、しばられたかんじありました。まわりの意見を聞かないときは、”まぁ、外国人だから、しょうがないかな”っとうこともありました。

妊娠、出産3回も経験したのですが、一人目の赤ちゃん生まれてから、お医者さんやまわりの皆の言いうことを一生懸命しょうとしましたが、結局ストレスが溜まっていくだけでした。二人目、三人目の赤ちゃんでは経験かさなって、自分にとって、赤ちゃんにとって、一番良い事をしました。好きなものをバランスよくたべましたし(ある程度で)、妊娠と失算が自分の中ではセレブレーション、お祝いであること、新たなライフステージが始まること。そういうしばって、静かにする、すごく気を遣う時期ではないと思いました。真夏で妊娠してても、おなかを巻き巻きすることもありますし、ぺちゃんこ靴、できる限りは髪の毛染めない、ジェルネイルはしない、などなどの妊婦さんたちがコットンウールの守ってるように感じました。

ニュージーランド首相:妊娠、出産

ニュージーランド首相、 ジャシンダ アーダーン氏が国のリーダーになって、すごい!!と思いました。その後、妊娠を報告して、さらに最近生まれてきましたね。とっても素敵で素晴らしいことと思いました。国の首相が妊娠中で不通に働いてる姿が”女子だなんて、なんでも出来る!”というメッセージ私に伝えました。その妊娠中であんなようなお仕事もこなして、ニュージーランド国民がそこまでワーキングマザーを応援するという事、世界中に伝わったと思います。
もちろん一人ではないです;心や精神的、肉体的、医療的、経済的なサポートがパトナーの方、政治団体の皆、国会議会の皆からありましたと思います。もしかして、ベビーシッター、ナニー、家事手伝い、オーペアもいるかもしれないです。ニュージーランドではお子さんお持ちの家庭にそいうサポートのオプションもあります。日本というとシッターさんは結構な値段もするし、ナニーお願いしてる家庭は経済的に余裕ありますし、都内すまれてる方が多いイメージですね。


ツウィッターでの書き込み


ニュージーランドの首相が”妊娠です”とか”出産しました”というニュースが流れて来たら、気になってツウィッター見に行きました。彼女が”妊娠されて、無責任、避妊をなぜ使ってないの?”などのコメントはありました。他のユーザが、”ニュージーランドと日本なんて比べられない、経済力全然違います”っと、他のユーザが、”文化の違いが大きいので国比べない”など

こういう「女性、事実婚、仕事しながら妊娠されてる、出産して、育児休暇6週間をとる」という方が首相であることはいろんな方が一旦考えさせた事がとっても良い事と面ます。
普段のいつものパターン、いつものやり方と違うやり方を目にしてよかったと思います。いくらネガティブでもポジティブ意見があっても、マスコミや、一般の日本の国民がこういった話しは話し出す事自体が良いと思います。話さないままより良いのです。

母親になる

日本の社会で母親に対する機体は多いと思います。子供は小学校入学する前の時期では「ママはお家に居たほうが良い」っという考えが強く感じまして。自分もちゃんと主婦して、お家に居たほうが皆にとって幸せ。同世代のママたち、年寄の方から私もそうしてるのであなたもそうしなさいっという感じもよくありました。専業主婦の方、は自分がそう決めたら、幸せであれば、専業主婦で良いと思います。後になって、自分が専業主婦に向いてない事を気づきました。

娘が生まれて一年の間は専業主婦でした。ただ世界が狭くなった気がして、結局ストレスになりました。まわりのママたちは親子カフェでランチしたり、ショッピングモールでぶらぶら、趣味や習い事行ったりしてました。自分が見てたところから、子供が中心になってきました。そいういった生活をちゃんとおくるために動力をしましたが、なんとなくバランスとれなかった気持になってうまくいかなかった。少しでも自分の時間、自分の世界、が後になって、気づかれました。育ってくれた母親が私が小さい頃から働いてたっという思い出があります。ところで3人のこどもを育児しながら大学院も卒業した事もあります。つまりその「母でも働く」事が自分のなかでは当たり前。

ママ友に”今保育園探してて、お仕事復帰します”っと報告したところで、”え~?なに、主婦じゃ満足できないの?”っというまわりからの反応でした。

専業主婦されてる間に、自分の世界が狭くなった事とほかに、ママ友同士のケンカ、競争に気付きました。赤ちゃんのうちに、出来る・出来ない事を比べたり、住んでる場所、家かマンション、賃貸がマイホーム、駅からの距離、車のタイプ、主人の職業、年収、ママと子供はどういうブランドの服着てるとか。もしかしてだけど、たまに主婦されてる方って、世が狭くなることによって、身に近いところばっかりを気にする事になる。なんとなくその比べる事とか競争する事が合わなかったと思います。

育児休暇終わる前に、復帰の準備し始めたところ、申し込んだ保育園の7ヵ所ほどがいっぱいでした。9年以上前の話ですが日本の出産率が下がってるけど、復帰したいっという母親の数字が上がったことにって未だに待機児童問題があります。
ツウィッターで「保育園落ちた、死ね!」っという書き込みが解す多いほどのリツウィートをさてれて、マスコミやニュースがピックアップして、すい同じ用な保育園に落ちたっという両親が国会ビルの前でデモ行ったことまで暗いマックしました。国会議会がWomenomicsや女性を働いてほしいといくら言ってても、足りないインフラやサポートで母親たちが起こってました。そういったインフラ、建物、施設、法律、サポートはついていくまでしばらく時間がかかると思います。保育園は建てられてるのですが、地域によって待機児童問題は変わらない。保育園入るために別の地域に引っ越していく方の話しもあります。

ジェシカがニュージーランド出身、3児の母、タレントです。
TwitterとInstagramのフォローお願いいたします:@jessintokyo

【翻訳:Jessica Gerrity】

Published by

tokyointerlopers

Finding diversity and inclusion. Breaking down barriers one post at a time. Stories and snapshots of foreigners making their way in Japan.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s