Family Bonding Time

“I left my job because I value my time with my family and I was looking for something that would help me run a business, to find my own meaning and purpose in life. I don’t come from a well-to-do family. My dad used to be a detective, a police officer, while my mom did her own small businesses, such as wedding catering, sewing and stitching. But all that stopped when she was pregnant with my younger sister, who was born prematurely. Me and my older brother basically had to look after ourselves because dad was always on call for duty. Good thing grandma, mom, and dad taught us good morals, the concept of integrity, and how to be independent (since no one will feed you. You have to grow up and find your own meaning and purpose.). So we practically raised ourselves and learned how to overcome adversity. Now my parents are old and I want to spend more time with them by helping out in the family business. I also wish to help other families achieve the same thing because here in Singapore, everything is fast-moving and we’re losing that core family value, that foundation. Some people leave their parents on their own to survive. Not to stereotype, but I notice, regardless of race—whether you’re Chinese, Malay or Indian—we are losing that value. It used to be in the olden days, the kids will take care of their parents. That’s why our vision is to strengthen that family bond through our pre-cooked, frozen food products that can help busy moms or adults prepare meals at home without having to spend too much time thinking about what dish to serve or how. They can just add water, fish or meat and it’s ready. I’m helping out with the business because I at least want to help other people have more family bonding time. Me, I’m trying to make up for lost time.”


Faizal gave up his work to attend business school and help their small family-owned frozen food pastes business: http://www.dapurexpress.com.sg/

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tokyointerlopers

Finding diversity and inclusion. Breaking down barriers one post at a time. Stories and snapshots of foreigners making their way in Japan.

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