Otherness

***日本語訳は下をご覧ください***
“I don’t feel like I’ve had the kind of experience that everyone thinks you’ll have when you come to Japan or Tokyo. I think everyone imagines that I am going out and living this crazy life, dressing up in kimono or meeting loads of people. Actually, my seven years in Japan have been really isolated. It’s been difficult to meet people, although I’m fairly lucky to have made really good friends at my job, where it’s pretty much all international staff. But it’s nowhere near as exciting or social as I thought my life was going to be. And then the way I look has a bit of an effect. Initially it was something I was conscious of. I even tried to cover up and look as invisible as possible, because I didn’t want to get stared at, which happens a lot. Sometimes people would see me in the supermarket, look, then turn around and walk the other way. Some get shocked that I exist and I’m walking around. That made me really nervous. My Japanese is quite good but I’ve developed a complex in speaking it because people would just look at me but not hear me. That initially affected how I saw myself and how outgoing I was. But after a couple of years, I realized I can’t disappear no matter what I do. I’m going to be visible. I can’t hide forever. I can’t please everybody. All I can do is accept my ‘otherness’. That helped me develop some resilience. I’m kind of okay with it now. It doesn’t really bother me anymore. Actually it’s nice because people come up to me, like little old ladies who touch my arm, looking amazed at my tattoos. I think it’s cute because it starts a dialogue and shows them that people who look like me aren’t scary. It makes me hopeful there’ll be more tolerance. That said, I’m definitely going to be happy being somewhere else where people are more welcoming or maybe a little bit more diverse.”

At Ryogoku Station

人と違う自分

「日本や東京へ来る外国人なら誰もが期待するような出来事は、わたしには起こらなかった。いつも外出ばかりして刺激的な毎日を送り、着物を着てたくさんの人と会っている姿を想像されていると思う。でも実際は、日本での7年間はすごく孤独なものだった。職場では同僚のほとんどが外国人で、幸運にも良い友人たちに恵まれたけれど、それでも人と出会うのはとても難しいことだったの。自分の思い描いていたような、刺激的で社交的な生活からは、かなりかけ離れたものだった。

わたしの外見も少し影響していると思う。当初はそればかり気にしていたのよ。よく人からじろじろ見られていて、それがすごく嫌だった。それで、身体をすっぽり隠して出来るだけ人から見られないようにと努力していたこともあったわ。スーパーでわたしを見て、踵を返す人だっていた。わたしがそこに存在して、ただ歩いているだけでショックを受ける人だっていたの。こういう出来事が、わたしを神経質にさせていった。

わたしはせっかく日本語が上手に話せるのに、みんなわたしの話なんて聞いてくれなかった。わたしの外見をただ見ていただけ。それで、話すことにコンプレックスを抱くようになってしまった。これがはじめ、わたしの自分自身の捉え方と社交性に影響を与えていたわ。でも数年後、何をしたって、わたしは決して消えることなんてできないと気づいたの。そして、人から見えないように努力するのをやめた。永遠に隠れていられるわけなんてない。全員に気に入られるなんて無理。わたしにできることは、自分の『人と違うところ』を受け入れること。そして、これが立ち直る力になったの。今は人と違っていても大丈夫だと思えるし、それで悩むこともなくなったわ。

自分が人と違うということは、素敵なことだとさえ思う。例えば、小さな老女がやってきて、わたしの腕に触れるの。そして腕のタトゥーを見て驚くのよ。そこから対話が始まるなんて素敵だと思うし、わたしのような見た目の人たちが決して怖くないってことも伝えられる。もっと理解してもらえるはず、と希望が見出せたわ。

つまり、もっと友好的で、もっと多様性が認められるようなところでなら、わたしは間違いなく幸せでいられるはずだから」

【翻訳:Junko Kato Asaumi

Published by

tokyointerlopers

Finding diversity and inclusion. Breaking down barriers one post at a time. Stories and snapshots of foreigners making their way in Japan.

One thought on “Otherness

  1. I enjoyed reading this. I’m actually going to spend a lot of time in Japan this summer and reading this actually gave me some idea of what was to come. Of course, everyone’s experience may be different but it’s good to be aware that this may happen. Especially being a queer, person of color like myself, it’s good to know how you may or may not be treated. I do know Japan is not a huge meeting pot like the US or even UK so they’re not experienced to culture like us a lot. That can definitely have affect.
    Nice reading your post! Look forward to seeing more!

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s